'He had no fear - as brave as they come'

'He had no fear - as brave as they come'

By

“He was as brave as they come.” From a player as courageous as John Worsfold, that’s some praise.

Worsfold, the former Eagles coach and captain, was among many to pay tribute to Beau Waters on Thursday after the 28-year-old vice-captain called time on his AFL career.

Jude Bolton, another who never took a backwards step, tweeted @AFLPlayers his thoughts: “Tough as nails Beau Waters. Such a shame to see another career cut short due to the rigours of the game.”

At the AFL Players’ MVP Awards in 2012, Waters was a joint winner of the Robert Rose Award for Most Courageous Player alongside Joel Selwood.

Other names on that trophy include Glenn Archer, Paul Kelly, Michael Voss and Luke Hodge.

“Beau had no fear. He was as brave and as tough as anyone going around. As brave as they come,” Worsfold told AFLplayers.com.au.

“Even one of the grabs he took in the 2006 grand final was just brave, just the same as always. He threw himself back hard every time, it was never tentative.”

“He was a great role model for players coming into the football club because of the enormous charity work he did. He really cared about it. ” – john Worsfold on beau waters

In the reviews of Waters’ 120-game career, it’s his uncompromising style which keeps cropping up, along with his role in West Coast’s 2006 premiership triumph and being named All-Australian in 2012.

Waters, however, had a slightly different take on his time at the Eagles.

“I think my involvement with charity helped make me who I am today,” he told his farewell media conference.

Worsfold said Waters was as much admired at the Eagles for his work away from the football club as he was for his ability on it.

Waters was acknowledged for his contribution to community and charitable organisations last year when he was presented with the Jim Stynes Community Leadership Award.

He has campaigned for many charities and groups. His role as an ambassador for the Cancer Council WA over the past decade saw West Coast raise almost $1 million for cancer research.

“He was a great role model for the footy club. His community work was outstanding,” Worsfold said.

“Even though he worked and trained and dedicated himself greatly to footy, he focused on things away from the game. He really had that balance.”

“He was a great role model for players coming into the football club because of the enormous charity work he did. He really cared about it. He has been a fantastic person at the footy club.”

What do you think?

Please enter a screen name and valid email address

or connect via the following
social networks